Xamarin Mono Mac Download

  
  1. Xamarin Studio Mac
  2. Xamarin Mono Download
  3. Download Xamarin For Mac
  4. Mono Vs Xamarin

Xamarin for osx 10.5.8 social advice Mac users interested in Xamarin for osx 10.5.8 generally download. The latest version of Xamarin Android Player is 0.6 on Mac Informer. It is a perfect match for the System Tools category. The app is developed by Xamarin and its user rating is 3 out of 5. 1 Add the Mono repository to your system. The package repository hosts the packages you need, add it with the following commands in a root shell. Note: the packages should work on newer CentOS versions too but we only test the ones listed below.

macOS is my operating system of choice, but oddly I do most of my professional programming with the .NET Framework. Historically, the choice of Macs paired with .NET would raise eyebrows, but not anymore. The release of .NET Core has made the .NET ecosystem more welcoming of folks with other operating systems.

It’s undeniable that Xamarin helped pave the way for technological diversity in the .NET space. While we’re reaping the benefits now, the idea of developing native macOS applications has never really piqued my interest until now.

In this post, we’ll be following Microsoft’s guide to building a Hello, Mac native mac application using Xamarin.Mac tweaked for JetBrains Rider.

Why Use Xamarin.Mac

There are multiple cross-platform frameworks for building native applications: Xamarin.Forms, Uno Platform, Electron, and more. So why choose Xamarin.Mac?

Xamarin.Mac gives us the ability to write truly native apps for macOS. We get to use macOS’ buttons, labels, windows, and the entire UI toolkit. It’s an ideal choice for folks looking to target macOS only. Native macOS components fulfill the needs of our UI, while we can lean on the power of the .NET Framework to handle backend functionality.

macOS applications utilize the Model-View-Controller pattern, which makes it possible for other technologies to step into the backend role. In this demo, we’ll be using C#.

Getting Started

Before we get started writing the demo, we’ll need all of our dependencies installed.

  1. Xamarin iOS & Mac
  2. Mono

We can download XCode from the Apple AppStore. Installation of the other two dependencies can happen from inside of JetBrains Rider. In the Preferences window, we can select Environment and select Mono and Xamarin iOS & Mac.

Warning to the uninitiated, installing XCode is going to take a while. Now is a good time to get a snack, hug loved ones, and pet the family dog.

Hello Demo

From the JetBrains Rider welcome dialog, we start by locating the Xamarin category on the left. From there, the dialog updates allowing us to choose the Platform. In our case, we want to target macOS. For the sake of this demo, the Target macOS API is irrelevant, but we can pick one that sparks joy. We can not create the project.

Noticing the layout of our project, we see a few native macOS files mixed with C# files. In this demo, we’ll be focusing primarily on ViewController as it will hold our logic.

Before we can start writing any C# code, we need to create outlets on our controller so that the UI can communicate with the backend. We can do this by right-clicking the Main.storyboard file and selecting Open in XCode.

With XCode open, we can change some settings. Let’s add a few controls and link them back to our controller. To open the library, we’ll use the shortcut Shift+Command+L (⇧⌘L).

From here, we can drag a Push Button and a Label to our view. We can play with the layout settings for each control, but it is unnecessary for this tutorial. We could spend forever making the UI “perfect”.

From here, let’s create a few outlets. From XCode, we need to open the ViewController.h file, which holds our ViewController interface. We’ll want to have two editors side-by-side, we can create the layout by clicking a button in the top right of our current editor. We’ll highlight the button below in a purple box.

The next step is where the magic happens. We will create the outlets in our ViewController. Holding down the Ctrl (⌃) key, we’ll click the button and drag it right below the close } and between @end.

We want to choose Action from the Connection dropdown and give the Action a name. In this case, we give it the name of ClickedButton. We also want the Type to be NSButton.

Next, let’s add the label to our ViewController. Holding Ctrl (⌃), we need to drag an outlet in between the {} of ViewController. We should see an Insert Outlet label. We can now give our new outlet a name, in this instance, we can use CountLabel. If its unclear, please watch the video below.

Our ViewController.h file should now contain the following code.

We can save the file now and go back to Rider. When we look at ViewController.Designer.cs we’ll notice that Rider generated the outlets necessary to interact with our macOS UI.

We’ll need to add the following code to our ViewController class.

When we run the application, we can increment the counter by clicking the button.

Hooray! We have our first native macOS application. If your clicks aren’t going through, be sure that the connection between the button and the ViewController is active in XCode. You can do this by right-clicking the button in XCode.

Conclusion

I love macOS but never thought of writing any apps for it, which seems like an oversight on my part. Using JetBrains Rider, we can use our favorite IDE while developing apps for our operating system of choice. With Xamarin.Mac we get a native app experience with the ability to use .NET to handle the backend. We also get to use native .NET debugging tools to diagnose issues.

I hope you found this tutorial helpful. Please leave a comment below if you have any questions.

JetBrains Rider supports creating and working with Xamarin applications for both Android and iOS. Although currently JetBrains Rider does not provide a designer or a previewer for Xamarin forms, you can still benefit from code analysis, coding assistance, and debugging features in C#, VB.NET, and other languages, as well as from general IDE features, such as the integrated VCS client.

If other tools that Xamarin relies on (for example, Android SDK, Android Emulator) are configured properly, you will be able to build and run your Xamarin application right from the JetBrains Rider IDE.

Xamarin SDK

To develop Xamarin Applications you need to have a Xamarin SDK on your machine. There are two different Xamarin SDKs — for iOS/Mac and for Android.

Xamarin SDK consists of two parts:

  • Assemblies with .NET types for the target platform. For example, a .NET type to represent the base OSX NSObject. Using these assemblies, IDE and compiler resolve and build user code.

  • Tools that transform .NET projects into native applications, which can be deployed and executed on the emulator or a physical device. For example, using these tools .apk packages for Android are built.

JetBrains Xamarin SDK

JetBrains Rider can use different Xamarin SDKs, for example the one from Visual Studio. However, if you do not have Visual Studio on your machine, you can use JetBrains Xamarin SDK prepared and packed by the JetBrains Rider team.

JetBrains Xamarin SDK is a custom build of Xamarin GitHub sources with some improvements and additional code.

Currently JetBrains Xamarin SDK lacks some features compared to Visual Studio Xamarin SDK, but it is in the process of constant improvement.

Xamarin Studio Mac

JetBrains Xamarin SDK is available for Windows and macOS:

There are two JetBrains Xamarin SDK builds available on Windows targeting the following platforms:

  • Apple platform (iOS, Mac, tvOS, watchOS)

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for iOS development provides a limited feature set on Windows. For example, currently it does not support connecting to a remote Mac and perform full build/deploy.

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Apple platforms on Windows ships as a .zip file (~ 60Mb) and installs into the JetBrains MsBuild directory:
    %LOCALAPPDATA%JetBrainsBuildTools.

  • Android

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android development provides a solid feature set. However, fast deployment is currently not supported.

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android platforms on Windows ships as a .zip file (~ 700Mb) and installs into the JetBrains MsBuild directory:
    %LOCALAPPDATA%JetBrainsBuildTools.

There are two JetBrains Xamarin SDK builds available on macOS targeting the following platforms:

  • Apple platform (iOS, Mac, tvOS, watchOS)

    On macOS, JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Apple platforms provides almost the same feature set as Visual Studio SDK, all known scenarios are supported.

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for iOS development on macOS ships as a .dmg file (~ 700Mb) and installs into:

    • /Library/Frameworks/Xamarin.iOS.framework

    • /Library/Frameworks/Xamarin.Mac.framework

    • /Library/Frameworks/Mono.framework/External

  • Android

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android development provides a solid feature set. However, fast deployment is currently not supported.

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android development on macOS ships as a .dmg file (~ 700Mb) and installs into:

    • /Library/Frameworks/Xamarin.Android.framework

    • /Library/Frameworks/Mono.framework/External

Before you start

Xamarin aims to be executed on a variety of different platforms and therefore Xamarin development relies on several different tools for building and running your applications.

On Windows, you can develop Xamarin applications for any platform, but local build and run/debug is limited to Android devices and emulators.
If you use Visual Studio Xamarin SDK, you will be able to build and run your application on iOS and macOS. To do so, configure a Mac agent accessible on the network, and then connect to it (Tools iOS Xamarin Mac Agent).

  1. Install a Xamarin SDK for iOS on your machine in one of the following ways.

    • Install Xamarin in Visual Studio. Note that you can use Visual Studio Community, which is free. If you already have Visual Studio installed, you have to add Xamarin support to it.

    • Start installation of Xamarin iOS & Mac on the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S and follow the installation wizard. This way JetBrains Rider will automatically download and install JetBrains Xamarin SDK for iOS & Mac.

    • Alternatively you can clone the Xamarin open-source repo from GitHub, build it and install on the machine. This way is quite complicated and we do not recommend it.

  2. Install Android development tools in one of the following ways:

    • Start installation of Xamarin Android on the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S and follow the installation wizard. This way JetBrains Rider will automatically download and install JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android.

    • Alternatively, all components that are automatically installed on the the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S, could be also installed manually:

      • Rider Xamarin Android Support plugin. It has all necessary features, like Android SDK manager.

      • Android SDK developed and provided by Google. You can install it from Visual Studio, Android Studio, Rider (with Rider Xamarin Android Support plugin), or downloaded as a set of command line tools.

On macOS, you can develop, build and run fully cross-platform Xamarin applications.

  1. Install a Xamarin SDK on your machine in one of the following ways.

    • Install Visual Studio for Mac.

    • Start installation of Xamarin iOS & Mac on the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S and follow the installation wizard. This way JetBrains Rider will automatically download and install JetBrains Xamarin SDK for iOS & Mac.

    • Alternatively you can clone the Xamarin open-source repo from GitHub, build it and install on the machine. This way is quite complicated and we do not recommend it.

  2. For iOS and Mac development, install Xcode. You will need an Apple ID for installing and signing into Xcode. If you do not already have it, you can create a new one at https://appleid.apple.com.
    JetBrains Rider will detect Xcode automatically. If you have several Xcode versions, you can choose which one to use on the Build, Execution, Deployment iOS page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S.

  3. Install Android development tools in one of the following ways:

    • Start installation of Xamarin Android on the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S and follow the installation wizard. This way JetBrains Rider will automatically download and install JetBrains Xamarin SDK for Android.

    • Alternatively, all components that are automatically installed on the the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S, could be also installed manually:

      • Rider Xamarin Android Support plugin. It has all necessary features, like Android SDK manager.

      • Android SDK developed and provided by Google. You can install it from Visual Studio, Android Studio, Rider (with Rider Xamarin Android Support plugin), or downloaded as a set of command line tools.

You can check the status of Xamarin tools and install or update them on the Environment page of JetBrains Rider settings Ctrl+Alt+S:

Create and open Xamarin projects

JetBrains Rider supports creating new and working with existing projects. Project templates are available, too.

You can create a new Xamarin project in a new solution using File New.. or add a new Xamarin project to the existing solution by right-clicking the solution or solution folder node in the Solution Explorer, and choosing Add New Project.

Xcode integration on macOS

When developing Xamarin applications on macOS, it is recommended to edit resource files and connect resources to code using Xcode.

You can use context menus of .storyboard, .xib, .plist files or of the Xamarin macios project node to open them in Xcode.

If the file or project has never been opened in Xcode before, JetBrains Rider will generate an Xcode project as follows:

  • xcodeproj project specifications (a project descriptor similar to csproj but for Xcode) is generated

  • Source files for all user types inherited NSObject (forms, delegates, views, controls, and so on) in Objective C are generated

  • All resources (images, designer files) are copied

When the project structure is ready, Xcode will start automatically and you can use it to edit resources. Every time Rider receives focus, it looks for changes (edits in existing files, new files, removed files) and integrates these changes into the Xamarin .NET project. It modifies .designer.cs parts of user types (inherited from NSObject) and copies back all changed resources.

All Xcode-related events are printed in the Xcode console tool window, which appears when you open resources or projects in Xcode:

When you create a new Xamarin macios project

  1. JetBrains Rider creates the corresponding xcodeproj project (pbxproj and other necessary files) project in the objxcode subdirectory with all required settings and configurations.

  2. Copies of all content files (views, plist files, images, and so on) are created in that directory.

  3. For each ViewController type JetBrains Rider generates an objc class with actions and outlets.

  4. The generated project is opened automatically in Xcode.

When you made changes in Xcode and then switch to Rider

  1. All modified content files are copied back into .NET project.

  2. Settings are updated.

  3. objc files are parsed and *.designer.cs files are regenerated for view controllers. For all these files you will see a generated header:

    // WARNING//// This file has been generated automatically by Rider IDE// to store outlets and actions made in Xcode.// If it is removed, they will be lost.// Manual changes to this file may not be handled correctly.

Xamarin Mono Download

Run and debug Xamarin applications

When you create or open a Xamarin project, JetBrains Rider automatically creates run/debug configurations for each Xamarin project in the solution.

If you want to adjust something in the way your application starts and executes, you can edit and create new run/debug configurations. When you start a Xamarin application from the IDE, you can use the corresponding selector on the navigation bar to choose which configuration should be used:

Debug a Xamarin project, which was not created with JetBrains Rider

Mac
  1. In the Settings/Preferences dialog Ctrl+Alt+S, select Environment.

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  2. Enable Xamarin Android and Xamarin iOS & Mac support.

    If you are on Windows and have Xamarin SDK installed via Visual Studio, it will be detected automatically. Otherwise, JetBrains Rider will suggest installing JetBrains Xamarin SDK.

    JetBrains Xamarin SDK cannot be installed alongside with Visual Studio Xamarin SDK.

  3. Once Xamarin SDK is installed, you can create Xamarin-specific run/debug configurations.

  4. Open the Run/Debug Configuration dialog in one of the following ways:

    • Select Run Edit Configurations from the main menu.

    • With the Navigation bar visible (View Appearance Navigation Bar), choose Edit Configurations from the run/debug configuration selector.

    • Press Alt+Shift+F10, then press 0 or select the configuration from the popup and press F4.

  5. In the Run/Debug Configuration dialog that opens, press Alt+Insert or click , then choose Xamarin.Android, Xamarin.iOS, or Xamarin.Mac from the list.

  6. Specify the target project and other parameters if necessary, then click OK.

  7. Use the newly created configuration to run and debug your Xamarin project.

Webinar recording: Better Xamarin Development with Rider for Mac

You can also watch this webinar recording where Dylan Berry explores the various ways Rider can help you improve your coding speed and quality when developing Xamarin apps.

Download Xamarin For Mac

Webinar agenda:

  • 0:05 – Introduction

  • 1:22 – Tools are important

  • 11:00 – Get started with Rider on Mac

  • 13:43 – Exploring Rider

  • 1:04:46 – Plugins

Mono Vs Xamarin

Last modified: 29 December 2020